12: Argument Realisation of GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE Verbs in Functionally Motivated Approaches

Gudrun Rawoens (Gent), Brian Nolan (Dublin), Elke Diedrichsen (Dublin) & Ilona Tragel (Tartu)

The purpose of the workshop is to examine and discuss recent and current work in the use of functional, cognitive and constructional approaches to understanding the cross linguistic behaviour of the verbs GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE.

Contributions that offer a treatment of one or more of these verbs are very welcome.

The workshop will address the following main topics and research issues with respect to understanding the cross linguistic behaviour of the verbs GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE:

  • Mapping at the semantic-syntactic interface across these verbs
  • The argument structure of GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE verbs
  • The lexical semantics and event structure of GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE verbs
  • Argument realisation of GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE verbs in morphosyntax
  • The encoding of the significant thematic roles in these 3place syntactic constructions
  • Symmetries and asymmetries in the encoding of arguments in constructions using GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE verbs
  • Grammaticalisation with GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE
  • GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE in a constructional perspective
  • Information structure in constructions with GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE

The organisers of this workshop are a European group of linguists and computational linguists and computer scientists who have collaborated at various Societas Linguistica Europaea workshops and in the publication of the special issue of Linguistics (2012: 50-6) on GET verbs in European languages. The selection of GET verbs as a research topic was motivated in several ways and explained by their high frequency, their formal and semantic complexity, their high variability in cross linguistic comparisons and their susceptibility to semantic extension and to grammaticalization. There is already a substantial body of research on GIVE verbs, the verbal converses of GET verbs (Newman 1996 and Newman 1998).

The aim of the workshop is to draw a comprehensive, representative and detailed picture of the vast polysemy, multifunctionality and dynamics of GET, GIVE, PUT and TAKE verbs across languages. As these are highly dynamic verbs, their semantic and grammatical changes as well as their synchronic variation offer many research opportunities. However, we need to understand the behaviours and also syntactic construction patterns of these verbs in considerably more detail.